ISO Training
  ISO 9001
iso 9001, iso 14001, quality assurance, iso 9001
5s, 6 sigma, as 9000, as 9100, cgmp, current good manufacturing practices, iso 9000, iso 9001, iso 14000, iso 14001, iso 15161, iso 22000, iso 22002, iso/ts 16949, jaeger holland, jaeger-holland, lean, marty jaeger, martin jaeger, martin j jaeger, kanban, office kaizen, quality assurance, quality systems, tpm, sarbanes oxley, sarbanes-oxley, sox, total productive maintenance

Lean

The TPS House

5s, 6 sigma, as 9000, as 9100, cgmp, current good manufacturing practices, iso 9000, iso 9001, iso 14000, iso 14001, iso 15161, iso 22000, iso 22002, iso/ts 16949, jaeger holland, jaeger-holland, lean, marty jaeger, martin jaeger, martin j jaeger, kanban, office kaizen, quality assurance, quality systems, tpm, sarbanes oxley, sarbanes-oxley, sox, total productive maintenance

The TPS house.  The standard terminology.  The methodical approach to human relations with a new meaning for teams, team leaders and front-line management.  The focus on problem solving and continuous improvement rather than fault finding and the status quo.  And, last but not least, the tools and support apparatus to handle information and material in order to create a seamless stream of value from door-to-door.

Many organizations have effectively used lean principles in the past using Value Engineering or Work Simplification methodologies to eliminate waste and over the years much improvement has been achieved in the individual processes and as a result material and paperwork does move faster through the improved process.

However, overall lead times, door-to-door, and cost reduction efforts have not achieved their expectations.

As a result, best-in-class organizations have learned that both process-level improvements (process kaizen) and value stream improvements (system kaizen) are needed.

In the simplest sense, Lean is a waste management tool and one of the most significant contributions that Taiichi Ohno offered was the identification and classification of the 7 Great Wastes:

    Waste Examples of causes
  errors or defects poor design, lack of competency, incapable process
  processing (sometimes difficult to identify, it may appear that the process is actually adding value) no standardization, data reentry, poor communication, misunderstanding of internal and/or external customer requirements
  motion poor work arrangement, no ergonomic analysis
  delay idle operators, waiting on process input, idle time in process
  inventory "just-in-case" mentality, excess lot sizes, excess materials
  transportation needless transport and handling
  overproduction (the worst, it multiplies the previous 6!) producing more than the customer requires

Course Outline:

1) Learn the context of Lean
2) Discover how Lean can significantly reduce product lead times and eliminate waste
3) Learn about the '7 Great Wastes', discover where waste exists in your organization and explore proven methods for eliminating it
4) Learn how to use the tools, techniques and methods for implementing Lean
5) Review, discuss and learn how to apply a 5-step process for implementing lean;
6) Discover the value of mapping material and paperwork flows and how it leads to continual improvement; and,
7) Prepare 'current state' and 'future state' maps, calculating the opportunity for reduction in production lead time and processing time for one of the organization's value streams

  Lean

Learning how to use the tools and support apparatus to find the waste, and modify our processes to effectively eliminate it, is the challenge!

Course materials include an illustrated, 73-page course workbook;  value stream flow icon stencil; a comprehensive list of lean terms with pronunciation guidelines; interactive exercises; a video; numerous handouts;  implementation forms; and, examples.

How participants rated a recent workshop
(English was not the primary language for 6 participants.)

lean, marty jaeger, martin jaeger, martin j jaeger, kanban, kaizen

Participant's average test score on the 20-point post assessment was 91%.

Working in teams, participants:

1) instilled a common language for discussing lean and lean concepts;
2) saw how lean was applied in 2 separate case studies that focused on the implementation of kanban systems;
3) identified over 100 specific areas of waste in their organization and explored methods to eliminate it;
4) reviewed and discussed a 5-step thought process for value stream mapping;
5) learned how to use the stencils and forms for value stream mapping; and,
6) prepared 'current state' and 'future state' maps for a key product line.

Participant's comments on this 'how-to' course included:
     "Never realized we had so many cost saving opportunities."
     "Exercises got everyone involved."
     "Good class for my preparation for lean."
     "Great class!."

Management's comments on this 'how-to' course included:
    CEO - "Nine staff members came up to me and commented on how great the course was."

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Last Updated 11/10/2017

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